dinosaurs of the depths

Dinosaurs of the water, this is the nickname give to the species of fish known as the Lake Sturgeon. These fish are just one species of the many that swim the fresh water systems of Minnesota. They are known as the dinosaurs because they can range over 100 years old and grow to mammoth size, the most common size and location for these fish in the area it the Rainy River where the average fish size falls within the seasons slot sizes of 45 to 50 inches. One of the largest fresh water fish every netted in the mid west came from our neighbor to the east Wisconsin on beautiful lake Winnebago where the fish measured in at 240lbs  87.5 inches long and estimated at over 125 years old. How would you like to swim in that lake!

Lake SturgeonHowever, with any prized species it seems they are under fire for being over harvested in prior decades. In fact 19 of the 20 states where the fish was original sought to have made home they are now either threatened or endangered. In the late 1800’s it was said that nearly 5 million pounds of Lake Sturgeon were harvested in a single year. Much of the harvest was accredited to the value that was seen in them they could be used for a wide variety of things such as rare caviar. With the steep decline in populations the government has sent forth to step in and regulate these swimming dinosaurs in hopes to help increase them in their ecosystems and preserve them for future generations.

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One thought on “dinosaurs of the depths

  1. I am big into fishing and I see pictures from friends of mine that catch sturgeon all the time. I live about 2 hours from the Rainy River and have fished it many times, but have never caught one of these beasts. The are such an interesting fish, and I really do think they look like an underwater dinosaur because of the shape and detail on their body. It almost looks like they have spikes or plates on their body which I find really cool.

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